Tapping into EFT (Emotional Freedom Technique)

Dawson Church, PhD

Dawson Church, PhD, is a health writer and researcher in the fields of health, psychology, and spirituality.

He is the author of the best-selling book “The Genie in Your Genes: Epigenetic Medicine and the New Biology of Intention“, and founder of EFT Universe, one of the largest alternative medicine sites on the web.

He is the editor of the peer-reviewed journal “Energy Psychology: Theory, Research, and Treatment”, general manager of Energy Psychology Press, and a blogger for the Huffington Post.

In 2007 he founded the National Institute for Integrative Healthcare (NIIH), a nonprofit institution dedicated to the study and implementation of evidence-based psychological and medical techniques.

Now, I’m a skeptic when it comes to energy psychology, and much of what alternative medicine claims to offer, particularly when it comes to mental health.

However, rather than dismiss these concepts outright, I think it’s better to give them a fair hearing, and let you guys make up your own minds.

For those of you unfamiliar with EFT, or tapping as it’s commonly known, it’s basically a form of alternative medicine which claims that tapping on certain acupuncture points can help relieve various psychological problems.

In today’s episode we discuss the origins and theory behind EFT, it’s professed application to the likes of anxiety and PTSD, whether “blocked energy” is at the cause or effect of psychological distress, and whether or not the positive effects of EFT can be explained away by the placebo effect.

 

Recommended Links

DawsonGift.com – Download a free copy of the EFT Mini-Manual

EFT Universe –  The largest EFT site on the web.

EFT Tapping ‘How to’ Video with Dawson Church – YouTube

 

Some Opposing Viewpoints:

Emotional Freedom Techniques (EFT) – The Skeptic’s Dictionary

Can We Really Tap Our Problems Away? – Skeptical Enquirer

Time to turn off the Tap: Why Emotional Freedom Technique is dangerous nonsense – The Psychiatry SHO

Related Books

               

 

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Image courtesy: Tomás Fano

Maternal OCD: Striving to be Supermum

Dr. Fiona Challacombe

Dr. Fiona Challacombe (@DrFionaCh) is a research fellow and clinical psychologist working at the Maudsley Centre for Anxiety Disorders and Trauma, and the Section of Women’s Mental Health at Kings College London, where she specialises in maternal OCD and anxiety.

She is patron of Maternal OCD, a voluntary organisation dedicated to raising the profile of Obsessive Compulsive Disorder (OCD) for mothers.

Along with Prof. Paul Salkovskis (see episode #004), she is co-author of “Break Free from OCD: Overcoming Obsessive Compulsive Disorder with CBT“.

In today’s episode we explore how and why OCD manifests during the perinatal period, the nature and content of the obsessions and compulsions, and what causes maternal OCD? Is it down to hormonal changes, living in risk averse society, or the evolutionary desire to keep our children safe from harm?

We explore why maternal OCD is given such little attention compared to other mental health issues, whether or not this condition has long term ramifications for the children of parents with OCD, and most importantly how to seek treatment.

 

Recommended Links

Maternal OCD

OCD Action – A national (UK) charity for anyone with Obsessive Compulsive Disorder

OCD-UK – Supporting children and adults affected by Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder

Books Mentioned in This Episode

          

 

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Unmasking the Imposter Syndrome

Dr. Valerie Young

Valerie Young (@ValerieYoung) is an entrepreneur, keynote speaker and world renowned expert on the imposter syndrome.

Valerie first experienced imposter feelings herself during her graduate program at the University of Massachusetts in 1982, and has studied the phenomenon ever since.

After 30 years of insight, in 2011 she published the award winning book “The Secret Thoughts of Successful Women: Why Capable People Suffer from the Impostor Syndrome and How to Thrive in Spite of It“.

To date, she has taught her “How to Feel As Bright and Capable As Everyone Seems to Think You Are” program to over 80,000 people at organizations such as Boeing, Procter & Gamble, IBM, Apple, Chrysler, and Facebook.

In today’s episode we discuss the origins of the imposter phenomenon, why people experience it, who is most susceptible, why it can be harmful to our careers and mental health, and most importantly, how to overcome it.

 

Recommended Links

ImposterSyndrome.com

Thinking your way out of imposter syndrome – Valerie’s TED Talk

ChangingCourse.com – Turn your interests into income

Books Mentioned in This Episode

                    

 

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Image courtesy: JD Hancock

Dads in a Dark Place

Mark Williams

Mark Williams (@MarkWilliamsFMH) is the founder of Father’s Reaching Out and co-founder of International Father’s Mental Health Day (19th June).

After experiencing a traumatic labour during the birth of their son Ethan in 2004, both Mark and his wife Michelle struggled with crippling anxiety and post-natal depression.

While Michelle recovered, Mark continued on a downward spiral which eventually culminated in suicidal ideation and a complete nervous breakdown.

After finally seeking help, Mark has since made a full recovery, and now makes it his life’s mission to raise awareness of perinatal mental health issues in fathers.

Mark has spoken around the World at over 150 conferences and events, and has written about fathers’ mental health in several publications.

He has appeared on numerous TV news outlets and has also appeared in television documentaries concerning mental health including Channel 5’s “My Secret Past” discussing post-natal depression.

In 2012 he was awarded “Local Hero” at the Pride of Britain Awards and Inspirational Father of the Year.

 

Recommended Links

Father’s Reaching Out

Dads Cymru

Dads Matter UK

Fathers Mental Health Network

Maternal Mental Health Alliance

Postnatal depression and perinatal mental health (Partners Page) – Mind

Books Mentioned in This Episode

               

 

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Image courtesy: Andrés Nieto Porras

The Gift of Listening

Jenni McCartney

Jenni McCartney (@SamaritansJenni) has been a volunteer at Samaritans for more than 30 years, and in 2015 was elected Chair of Trustees, representing the charity’s 21,000 volunteers.

As part of her role she writes a blog for Samaritans’ internal website, delivers speeches at the Council of Samaritans and at branch AGMs, and spends time travelling round the 201 branches dotted throughout the UK and Ireland to meet with volunteers and help spread the word.

In recognition of these efforts, Jenni has been awarded the CharityComms Inspiring Communicator Award for her work engaging with volunteers, and for representing Samaritans in the media.

In today’s episode we learn about the history and formation of Samaritans, how and why Jenni first became a volunteer and, more importantly, why she decided to stick with it for more than thirty years.

We explore the most common reasons people turn to Samaritans, how it evolved from a suicide prevention line into an emotional support service that anybody could call for any reason, why Samaritans policy is primarily to listen without giving advice, and how this approach can often be more effective in helping callers find the answers they’re looking for.

We also explore what it’s like to be a volunteer answering calls, what’s involved in the training process, what you actually say and do when a call comes in, how you learn to help other people deal with their negative life experiences without letting it affect your own emotional well being, but ultimately, how listening to other people’s problems is, more often than not, a rewarding experience for both parties.

 

Recommended Links

Samaritans – Home Page

Samaritans Volunteer Sign-up Page

Books Mentioned in This Episode

 

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Why Do People Kill Themselves?

Prof. Rory O’Connor

Rory O’Connor (@suicideresearch) is Chair in Health Psychology, Head of Mental Health and Wellbeing at Glasgow University where he also leads the Suicidal Behaviour Research Laboratory, the leading suicide and self-harm research group in Scotland.

He is co-editor of “The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention“, Deputy Chief Editor of Archives of Suicide Research, and Associate Editor of Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior.

As well as serving on the Scientific Review Board of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, he also sits on the Scottish Government’s national suicide and self-harm implementation and monitoring group.

In today’s conversation we explore some common myths about suicide, why men are three times more likely than women to die by suicide and the role and responsibility of the media when it comes to reporting on this particular issue.

We discuss the development of Rory’s theory of suicidal behaviour and his mission to discover what separates the few people who die by suicide from the vast majority who don’t, the effectiveness of suicide awareness campaigns, why suicide should never be seen as a cop out and suicide attempts never dismissed as attention seeking.

We also spend a good deal of time exploring some practical advice for people, and the friends and relatives of those people, who are themselves feeling suicidal.

 

 

Integrated Motivational Volitional (IMV) Model of Suicidal Behaviour

 

Recommended Links

Suicidal Behaviour Research Lab

Media Guidelines for Reporting Suicide – Samaritans

How to Help Someone who is Suicidal and Save a Life – HelpGuide

How to make a suicide safety plan – SuicideLine

Books Mentioned in This Episode

     

 

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Image courtesy: Colin Knowles


CRISIS HELPLINES

UK & ROI

Samaritans

166 123

Available 24 hours a day, every day of the year. This number is FREE to call and won’t appear on your bill. You do not have to be suicidal to call.

USA

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline

1 800 273 8255

Available 24 hours a day, every day of the year. This number is FREE to call, but may appear on your bill (please check with carrier). You do not have to be suicidal to call.

Live outside the UK or US?

For a comprehensive list of international helplines, or to find a crisis centre in your area please click here!

Stigma and Discrimination in Mental Health

Prof. Graham Thornicroft

Prof. Graham Thorniocroft (@ThornicroftG) is Professor of Community Psychiatry at King’s College London, Consultant Psychiatrist for South London & Maudsley NHS Foundation Trust, and Chair of Maudsley International.

Graham has authored or edited over 460 peer-reviewed papers and 30 books including “The Oxford Textbook of Community Mental Health“, and the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion, “Shunned: Discrimination Against People with Mental Illness”.

In today’s episode we discuss the origins of stigma, from the etymology of the word itself to historical depictions of mental asylums. We draw lines of distinction between concepts such as ignorance, prejudice and discrimination and how each of these manifests in the real world.

We explore how the media depicts mental illness, how stigma is actually measured and quantified by researchers, the importance of anti-stigma campaigns such as Time To Change and the ways in which they’ve proved successful.

We touch on the recent trend in anti-stigma campaigns aimed specifically towards men, we ask if discrimination is ever justified, and most importantly Graham gives a few tips on how people with mental health issues can navigate the potential minefield of disclosure.

 

Recommended Links

Time to Change – Let’s end mental health discrimination

Mental Health Awareness Week (UK) – Mental Health Foundation

Mental Health Month (US) – Mental Health America

Books Mentioned in This Episode

     

 

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Image courtesy: Mark Chinnick

The Not So Simple Act of Caring

Prof. Fiona Lobban

Prof. Fiona Lobban (@fionalobban) is Professor of Clinical Psychology at Lancaster University, and Co-director of the Spectrum Centre.

She is also co-editor of “A Casebook of Family Interventions for Psychosis“, and the lead researcher in the Relatives Education and Coping Toolkit (REACT) study, to see whether an online intervention is helpful for close friends or relatives of people with bipolar disorder or psychosis.

Lizzi Collinge (@LizziCollinge) is a Labour County Councillor for Lancaster East, representing over 10,000 people, with a particular focus on health, social care, and disability equality.

Lizzi Collinge

She also works as part of the REACT research team, supporting participants to use the REACT toolkit, and has first-hand experience of caring for somebody with a severe mental health issue.

So, what does caring for somebody with severe mental health issues involve, and who typically takes on this role?

In today’s episode we discuss the emotional impact that being a carer can have, such as feelings of self blame, isolation and the threat of social stigma, and thus why carers are more susceptible to developing their own mental health issues, such as depression and anxiety.

We explore how caring can alter, and sometimes destroy, the dynamics of certain relationships, the impact that caring can have on people’s social lives, the art of knowing when to step in and take control versus knowing when to step back and let go, and why communication is the key to avoiding anger and resentment.

We look at some of the costs involved in caring and how it can sometimes affect a person’s ability to work, the kind of support that already exists for carers and what needs to improve, the importance of speaking to other people with lived experience in keeping up morale, and all-in-all, why carers are ultimately the unsung heros of our mental health system.

 

Fiona’s Recommended Links

REACT – Relatives Education and Coping Toolkit

Young Carers and Getting Help – YoungMinds

Support for Young Carers – ReThink

Books Mentioned in This Episode

          

 

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Image courtesy: Hernán Piñera

Insomnia and the Art and Science of Sleep

Prof. Jason Ellis

Jason Ellis (@JasonGEllis101) is Professor in Psychology at Northumbria University, and Director of the Northumbria Centre for Sleep Research, a purpose-built facility designed to study and treat disorders of sleep and wakefulness.

He’s the author of “The One-week Insomnia Cure: Learn to Solve Your Sleep Problems“, and in 2013 served as resident sleep expert on BBC One’s two-part series Goodnight Britain.

In 2015 he led the first ever study to attempt to treat insomnia in the acute phase – before it becomes chronic – and found that almost three-quarters of participants saw improvements in the quality of their sleep following a single one-hour therapy session.

Jason has presented his research at numerous conferences around the world, and is also actively involved in both public and professional engagement activities, speaking at the British Science Festival, TEDx Conference, and the National Science Learning Centre.

In today’s episode we discuss insomnia and how it relates directly to mood and mental health. So, what is sleep and why does it matter? How do a couple of sleepless nights turns into chronic insomnia for some people, and nothing more than a few groggy shifts at work for others?

We discover how the quality of our sleep can predict your likelihood of developing depression, why seasonal affective disorder is more of a sleep problem than a mood disorder, how daytime napping could be a sign of underlying health concerns, and the limits of medication.

We also discuss some of the more curious aspects of sleep, such as why we sometimes start body popping just as we’re about to nod off, why couples shouldn’t share a duvet, why none of us should be shy when trying out a mattress in the bed shop, why playing Candy Crush at bedtime could be messing up your circadian rhythms, and also how having sex in the kitchen could potentially help you sleep more soundly.

 

Jason’s Recommended Links

Northumbria Sleep Research Laboratory on Facebook

Books Mentioned in This Episode

          

 

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Image courtesy: Jacob Stewart

Bipolar Disorder: Seeking Peace Between Darkness and Chaos

Prof. Steven Jones

Professor Steven Jones (@lancsspectrum) is Professor of Clinical Psychology at Lancaster University, and Director of the Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research (@SpectrumCentre) conducting translational research into the understanding and psychological treatment of bipolar disorder and other related conditions.

He’s the editor and author of a number of books including “Coping with Schizophrenia: A Guide for Patients, Families and Caregivers“, and “Coping with Bipolar Disorder: A CBT-Informed Guide to Living with Manic Depression“.

So what is bipolar disorder, and how does it differ from plain old depression?

In this episode we untangle the various manifestations of bipolar including bipolar types 1 and 2, and cyclothymia. We discuss the nature and duration of mood swings and what triggers them, and we examine the concept of mania and manic episodes and how these affect people’s thoughts and behaviours.

We also explore mixed affective states, where the person experiences depression and mania simultaneously, and why this can increase the risk of suicide in people with bipolar.

We discover why both adolescence and middle age are times when people are particularly susceptible to the onset of bipolar, the causal link between sleep deprivation and mania, the controversial topic of bipolar in children and whether or not it actually exists, treatment options, personality variables, issues of cultural context, and loads more in between.

 

Steve’s Recommended Links

The Spectrum Centre for Mental Health Research

Bipolar disorder: assessment and management – NICE

Understanding Bipolar Disorder – BPS

Books Mentioned in This Episode

 

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Image courtesy: Al King