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Why Procrastination Makes You Depressed (and Depression Makes You Procrastinate)

Dr. Tim Pychyl

Dr. Tim Pychyl (@procrastwitate) is an Associate Professor in the Department of Psychology, and the Director of the Centre for Initiatives in Education at Carleton University, in Ottowa, Canada. His psychological research is focused on the breakdown in volitional action commonly known as procrastination, and how it relates to personal health and wellbeing.

He is the recipient of numerous teaching awards including the 3M National Teaching Fellowship, a Graduate Mentoring Award and the inaugural recipient of the University Medal for Distinguished Teaching.

He is the author of “Solving the Procrastination Puzzle: A Concise Guide to Strategies for Change“, the host of the iProcrastinate Podcast, writer of the brilliant Don’t Delay blog at Psychology Today, and founder of the Procrastination Research Group.

In today’s episode we explore how procrastination relates to things like depression and anxiety, we discuss the emotional factors that initiate and drive procrastination, and how it can affect not only your mental, but your physical health and wellbeing, by increasing your chances of things like coronary heart disease.

We discover why we’re terrible at forecasting our future moods and why you’ll never “feel like doing it tomorrow”, how to grease the wheels of productivity and boost your willpower, and why Homer Simpson might have something very profound to teach us about how we treat our future selves.

 

 

SHOW NOTES

Tims Recommended Links

Procrastination.ca – Home of the Procrastination Research Group

iProcrastinate Podcast

Don’t Delay – Tim’s blog at Psychology Today

Further Reading

Depression and Procrastination – Psychology Today

Weakness of Will – Stanford Encyclopedia of Philosophy

How Negative Emotions Lead to Self-Regulation Failure – Psychology Today

Procrastination can lead to heart problems – Science Alert

I’ll Feel More Like it Tomorrow – Psychology Today

It’s Time to Get Acquainted With Your Future Self – Science of Us

Forecasting the Future (Interview with Dan Gilbert) – Psychology Today

External Supports for Your Willpower – Psychology Today

Books Mentioned in This Episode

                                    

 

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Image courtesy: MattysFlicks

Childhood Mental Health and Raising Confident Kids

Prof. Sam Cartwright-Hatton

Samantha Cartwright-Hatton (@SamCH_ClinPsych) is Professor of Clinical Child Psychology and Senior Clinical Research Fellow at University of Sussex. She works as one of the clinical advisors to Anxiety UK, and in 2009 she received the British Psychological Society May Davidson Award in recognition of her research into childhood anxiety.

She’s the author of “Coping with an Anxious or Depressed Child: A Guide for Parents and Carers“, and “From Timid To Tiger: A Treatment Manual for Parenting the Anxious Child“.

In today’s episode we talk about depression and anxiety in preadolescent children, whether nurture or nature plays the biggest role in the development of childhood mental health, how you may be inadvertently teaching your child to be fearful of the world and how to stop doing so, why it’s more important to praise effort over ability, the seven confident thoughts that children need to grow up happy and confident, and why Sam is in favour of installing a communist dictatorship.

 

 

SHOW NOTES

Sam’s Recommended Links

Anxiety UK – National charity helping people with Anxiety.

Books Mentioned in This Episode

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Image courtesy: Guilherme Jofili

Depression and the Problems of Diagnosis

Prof. Chris Dowrick

We begin this podcast adventure exploring the topic of Depression. How do we define depression? Is depression the result of a “chemical imbalance”? Can you be genetically predisposed to it? Why are doctors so quick to prescribe medication? And is your GP even trained to spot depression?

My guest for this episode is Professor Chris Dowrick (@cfd1951). Chris is Professor of Primary Medical Care at the Institute of Psychology, Health and Society at the University of Liverpool, general practitioner with Aintree Park Group Practice, an honorary consultant in primary care for Liverpool Primary Care Trust, and a non-executive director for Mersey Care NHS Trust.

He’s also a member of the NICE guideline development group for depression and chronic physical disease.

He’s the editor-in-chief of the international journal Chronic Illness, and the author of the book “Beyond Depression: a new approach to understanding and management“, which forms the basis for today’s conversation.

Check out Chris’s blog: wellbecoming.blogspot.co.uk

 

 

SHOW NOTES

Further Reading

A very brief overview of some of Chris’s ideas from this January 2014 piece in the Daily Mail, based on a report he wrote for the British Medical Journal claiming that depression is over-diagnosed by doctors in primary care.

Iatrogenesis – Wikipedia

A brief summary of how various antidepressants work – Web MD.

NICE guidelines for assessing depression and its severity in adults.

A decent primer on the 5-HTT gene and it’s relation to susceptibility to depression.

Depression’s Evolutionary Roots – Scientific American.

Antidepressant Drug effects and Depression Severity: A Patient-Level Meta-Analysis – A study comparing the efficacy of antidepressants in relation to the severity of depressive symptoms.

The Media and the Chemical Imbalance Theory of Depression – A fascinating study discussing the media’s complicity in promoting the “chemical imbalance” theory of depression.

Books Mentioned in This Episode

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Image courtesy: Paolo De Angelis