David D. Burns, M.D.

Amongst many other achievements in a very long and distinguished career, David D. Burns M.D. is probably most famous as the author of “Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy”, a book which more than any other is responsible for thrusting CBT into the public consciousness in the early the 1980s, and has since gone on to sell in excess of 4 million copies in US alone.

This episode was a pretty special event for me. Not only because David is a huge figure in the cognitive therapy movement, while this is still a piddly little podcast with barely any listeners. But on a personal level because this very book had a massive impact on me during the peak of my struggles with mental illness, and gave me the impetus needed to take control of my situation. So it’s crazy that here I am almost two years later, well on the way to recovery, and interviewing him for a podcast.

Dr. Burns is currently Adjunct Clinical Professor Emeritus of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the Stanford University School of Medicine. He has received numerous awards, including the A. E. Bennett Award for his research on brain chemistry, the Distinguished Contribution to Psychology through the Media Award, and the Outstanding Contributions Award from the National Association of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapists.

In addition to Feeling Good, which also boasts the distinction of being the book most frequently “prescribed” for depressed patients by psychiatrists and psychologists in the United States and Canada, Dr. Burns has written a number of other popular books on mood and relationship problems, such as “10 Days to Great Self Esteem“, “When Panic Attacks“, and “The Feeling Good Handbook“.

He’s the creator of the Burns Depression Checklist, a 25 point questionnaire used by mental health professionals to detect and measure the severity of patient depression, which some of you may have filled out during the consultation phase with your therapist.

He’s also hosted a TEDx talk about “Feeling Good” which has so far amassed more than 95,000 views and counting on YouTube.

During the course of today’s episode we discuss the origins and trajectory of David’s career, the chemical imbalance “myth”, his phenomenally successful self-help book “Feeling Good: The New Mood Therapy”, the 10 cognitive distortions, his development of a new approach to cognitive therapy known as T.E.A.M therapy, and much more.

 

David’s Recommended Links

FeelingGood.com – David’s website

Books Mentioned in This Episode

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Prof. Alison Yung

In this episode we explore the topic of psychosis, susceptibility and early intervention. What is psychosis? How real are hallucinations and delusions? Are the likes of Fight Club and Mr Robot accurate depictions of psychotic episodes, or just Hollywood hyperbole? Who is most susceptible to this illness, and what can we do to intervene?

My guest for today’s episode is Professor Alison Yung (@alisonryung). Alison is Professor of Psychiatry at the University of Manchester, Honorary Consultant Psychiatrist at Greater Manchester West Mental Health NHS Foundation Trust, and Director of Undergraduate Education for the Institute of Brain Behaviour and Mental Health at the Manchester Medical School.

In 2009 she received the Lilly Oration Award for prominence in psychiatric research in Australia and New Zealand, and in 2010 was the recipient of the Richard J Wyatt Award “for remarkable contribution to the area of early intervention”.

She is the author of than 150 publications, a body of work which in 2014 helped her make it onto the Thomson Reuters list of the “World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds”, as one of the 100 most highly-cited researchers in the field of psychiatry and psychology.

 

Image courtesy: Theud-bald

Prof. Chris Dowrick

We begin this podcast adventure exploring the topic of Depression. How do we define depression? Is depression the result of a “chemical imbalance”? Can you be genetically predisposed to it? Why are doctors so quick to prescribe medication? And is your GP even trained to spot depression?

My guest for this episode is Professor Chris Dowrick (@cfd1951). Chris is Professor of Primary Medical Care at the Institute of Psychology, Health and Society at the University of Liverpool, general practitioner with Aintree Park Group Practice, an honorary consultant in primary care for Liverpool Primary Care Trust, and a non-executive director for Mersey Care NHS Trust.

He’s also a member of the NICE guideline development group for depression and chronic physical disease.

He’s the editor-in-chief of the international journal Chronic Illness, and the author of the book “Beyond Depression: a new approach to understanding and management“, which forms the basis for today’s conversation.

Check out Chris’s blog: wellbecoming.blogspot.co.uk

 

Books Mentioned in This Episode

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Image courtesy: Paolo De Angelis