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Dr. Brian King

Dr. Brian King (@drbrianking) is a psychologist, stand-up comedian and public speaker who travels the world as a performer and an instructor, giving seminars to thousand of people each year on the health benefits of humor.

He was the founder and producer of the highly reviewed Wharf Room Comedy show in San Francisco and produces the annual Bay Area comedy competition “Walk the Plank”.

Brian is the author of a number of books including “Frozen Coffee Melting“, “A Field Guide to the North American Bloody Mary“, and the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion, “The Laughing Cure: Emotional and Physical Healing – A Comedian Reveals Why Laughter Really is the Best Medicine“.

In today’s episode we explore the evolutionary origins of humor, whether being funny is a natural ability or a skill that anyone can learn, the anatomy of joke-telling, the mental and physical benefits of laughter, and why humor can be the perfect antidote to some of life’s darkest moments.

 

This episode has 22 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.





Related Links

Brian’s Website

Brian’s Facebook Page

Brian’s YouTube Channel

Science declares this is the funniest joke in the world – CNet

Book Recommendations

               

Image courtesy: Petful via Flickr

Roland Griffiths, Ph.D.

Roland Griffiths, Ph.D. is Professor in the Departments of Psychiatry and Neurosciences at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine.

Roland is author of over 360 journal articles and book chapters. He has been a consultant to the National Institutes of Health, and to numerous pharmaceutical companies in the development of new psychotropic drugs. He is also currently a member of the Expert Advisory Panel on Drug Dependence for the World Health Organization.

In 1999 he initiated a pioneering research program at Johns Hopkins investigating the psychological and therapeutic effects of the hallucinogen psilocybin, a naturally occurring psychedelic compound produced in psilocybin mushrooms, known colloquially as magic mushrooms.

His studies have included investigations into psilocybin-occasioned mystical-type experiences in healthy volunteers, psilocybin-facilitated treatment of cigarette smoking cessation, and treatment of psychological distress in cancer patients with life threatening prognoses.

In today’s episode we explore the origin and history of psilocybin research, what it looks like to experiment with psychedelics in a clinical setting, the nature of the hallucinations experienced by participants, and the potential for psilocybin to produce long term, clinically significant reductions in depression and anxiety, along with increases in quality of life, life meaning, and optimism, with just one single dose.

 

Related Links

Roland Griffiths Laboratory at John Hopkins

The science of psilocybin and its use to relieve suffering – Roland’s TEDMED Talk

Book Recommendations

               

Images courtesy: Bernard Spragg. NZ 

 

Dr. Christopher Hamilton

Dr. Christopher Hamilton is Reader in Philosophy at King’s College, London, where he teaches philosophy, literature and film.

His research interests include the relationship between philosophy and literature, and between moral, religious and aesthetic value,¬†the nature of good and evil, the philosophy of tragedy, and¬†the work of both Friedrich Nietzsche and S√łren Kierkegaard.

He is the author of a number of books including “How to Deal with Adversity“, “A Philosophy of Tragedy“, and the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion “Middle Age” from the Art of Living Series.

In today’s episode we discuss the philosophy of middle age, and the midlife crisis.

What does it mean to be middle aged, when does middle age start and why does it matter? We discuss the relationship between the midlife crisis and such things as loss of identity, the search for meaning, and the fear of death.

We ask why the crisis of middle age tends to be a uniquely male phenomenon, whether or not our cultural worship of youthfulness is justified, reasons why the midlife crisis can sometimes find expression in immature and reckless behaviour, but also, why purchasing a leather jacket and a convertible sports car might not necessarily be such a bad thing.
 

Related Links

Christopher’s Profile at King’s College London

Christopher’s¬†Speakers Profile at the Institute of Art and Ideas¬†(includes a bunch of different video talks and debates)

Christopher’s FREE online course on¬†Life, Meaning and Morality

Book Recommendations

                          

Image courtesy: Ubi Desperare Nescio

Scott Anderson

Scott Anderson (@Psychobiotic) is a veteran science journalist with specialization in medical research and computer programming. He is the author of a number of books covering topics as diverse as Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Video Production skills, and he was also one of the creators behind the computer game Lego Island, which was one of the biggest selling computer games of the 90’s.

Scott runs a laboratory called Freedom Health that studies bacterial health in racehorses and has developed prebiotics for animals and humans, and his newest book “The Psychobiotic Revolution“, along with John Cryan and Ted Dinan from the APC Microbiome Institute, explores how and why¬†your brain health and state of mind are intimately connected to your gut microbiome.

In today’s episode we discuss the history of the gut-brain research, how the gut and the brain communicate with one another, why the bacteria living in your digestive system may contribute to mental health conditions such as depression and anxiety, how western dietary habits lead to the destruction of a healthy gut ecology, and we also discuss some of the pre and probiotic foods that you can start consuming to bring your brain and body back into balance.

 

Related Links

Feed Your Microbes, Nurture Your Mind – John Cryan, TEDx Talk

Food for thought: How gut microbes change your mind – John Cryan TEDMED Talk

Book Recommendations

Images (modified) courtesy: Hey Paul Studios (Brain, Gut) 

Well, it had to happen sooner or later, I suppose.

In today’s episode I share my own story of my decent into madness. Beginning with my early childhood flirtations with hypochondria, I take you all the way through my battles with depression, anxiety, agoraphobia, and depersonalization, right the way through to hitting rock bottom in early 2015 when I experienced a brief period of suicidal ideation.

If that doesn’t sound morbid enough, on the way we’ll encounter adoption, drugs, prostitution, strip clubs, brothels, lies, infidelity, gangland violence, ambition, failure, bankruptcy, nudists, modern art, tongue piercings, and my illustrious career as a dog shit picker-upper.

Enjoy!

I’ve included some photos and links below to add a few visuals to the narrative, or just in case anyone thinks I might be telling porkies pies.

 

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Related Links

Hit me up on Twitter: @dannydwhittaker

Calls for investigation after brothel charges – Manchester Evening News

Clubland shooting victim named – BBC

Teen’s key-fob death is still a mystery¬† – Manchester Evening News

Skinbook: Facebook for 21st Century Nudists – TIME

Book Recommendations

 

Elaine Hanzak

Elaine Hanzak (@elainehanzak) is an author and speaker who uses her experience with postnatal depression and bereavement to deliver keynote presentations on overcoming loss and perinatal mental health.

She is the author of two books, “Eyes Without Sparkle: A Journey Through Postnatal Illness“, which today’s discussion is based on, and the follow-up “Another Twinkle in the Eye: Contemplating Another Pregnancy After Perinatal Mental Illness“.

In 2016 Elaine was nominated for the “Cheshire Woman of the Year” Award for her contribution to community services, and in 2017 she was a finalist at the British Journal of Midwifery Awards in the category of contribution of a non-midwife to mid-wifery practices.

In today’s episode Elaine shares her experience of postnatal depression. How despite dreaming of motherhood her entire life, a traumatic labour, months of sleep deprivation, and the pressures of aspiring to be the perfect mum, eventually caused her to spiral into a period of depression, self-harm, psychosis, and eventually being admitted to a psychiatric hospital.

Having since made a full recovery, Elaine tells us what the experience has taught her about motherhood and life, and she also offers some simple self-care practices to help future mums avoid a similar fate.

 

Related Links

Hanzak.com – Elaine’s website

Elaine Hanzak Facebook Page

Maternal Mental Health Alliance –¬†a UK coalition improving the mental health of women and their children during the perinatal period

Book Recommendations

     

Image courtesy: Jake Guild

 

Prof. Carmine Pariante

Carmine Pariante (@ParianteSPILab) is Professor of Biological Psychiatry at Kings College London, where he also leads the Stress, Psychiatry and Immunology (SPI) Lab, investigating the relationship between stress, mental health and the immune system.

Carmine is the editor of a number of books including “Understanding Depression: A Translational Approach“, and “Behavioral Neurobiology of Stress-related Disorders“, and he also writes a blog for the Huffington Post.

He has received a number of awards for his research including¬†the 2012 ‚ÄúAcademic Psychiatrist of the Year‚ÄĚ Award from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, the 2015 Anna-Monika Prize for Research on Depression, and the Norman Cousins Award for outstanding contributions to research in psychoneuroimmunology.

In today’s episode we discuss the biology of stress, everything from the anatomy of the brain, to the endocrine system, and how it’s all functions together. We explore the evolutionary advantages of the stress response, how the pressures of modern life can cause stress to become chronic, and how the physiological damage of long-term stress can lead to conditions such as anxiety and depression.

 

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Related Links

Stress, Psychiatry and Immunology (SPI) Lab – Facebook Page

Book Recommendations

          

Image courtesy: Amy McTigue

 

Mark Williams

Mark Williams (@MarkWilliamsFMH) is the founder of Father’s Reaching Out and co-founder of International Father’s Mental Health Day (19th June).

After experiencing a traumatic labour during the birth of their son Ethan in 2004, both Mark and his wife Michelle struggled with crippling anxiety and post-natal depression.

While Michelle recovered, Mark continued on a downward spiral which eventually culminated in suicidal ideation and a complete nervous breakdown.

After finally seeking help, Mark has since made a full recovery, and now makes it his life’s mission to raise awareness of perinatal mental health issues in fathers.

Mark has spoken around the World at over 150 conferences and events, and has written about fathers’ mental health in several publications.

He has appeared on numerous TV news outlets and has also appeared in television documentaries concerning mental health including Channel 5’s “My Secret Past” discussing post-natal depression.

In 2012 he¬†was awarded “Local Hero” at the Pride of Britain Awards and Inspirational Father of the Year.

 

Recommended Links

Father’s Reaching Out

Dads Cymru

Dads Matter UK

Fathers Mental Health Network

Maternal Mental Health Alliance

Postnatal depression and perinatal mental health (Partners Page) – Mind

Books Mentioned in This Episode

               

 

Image courtesy: Andrés Nieto Porras

Jenni McCartney

Jenni McCartney (@SamaritansJenni) has been a volunteer at Samaritans for more than 30 years, and in 2015 was elected Chair of Trustees, representing the charity’s 21,000 volunteers.

As part of her role she writes a blog for Samaritans’ internal website, delivers speeches at the Council of Samaritans and at branch AGMs, and spends time travelling round the 201 branches dotted throughout the UK and Ireland to meet with volunteers and help spread the word.

In recognition of these efforts, Jenni has been awarded the CharityComms Inspiring Communicator Award for her work engaging with volunteers, and for representing Samaritans in the media.

In today’s episode we learn about the history and formation of Samaritans,¬†how¬†and why¬†Jenni first became a volunteer and, more importantly, why she decided to stick with it¬†for more than thirty years.

We¬†explore the most common reasons people turn to Samaritans, how it evolved from a suicide prevention line into an emotional support service¬†that anybody could call for any reason, why¬†Samaritans policy is primarily to listen without giving advice, and¬†how this approach can often be more effective in helping callers¬†find the answers they’re looking for.

We also explore what it’s like to be a volunteer answering calls,¬†what’s involved in the training process, what you actually say and do when a call comes in, how you learn to help other people deal with their negative life experiences¬†without letting it affect your own emotional well being, but ultimately, how¬†listening to other people’s problems is, more often than not,¬†a rewarding experience for both parties.

 

CRISIS HELPLINES

SAMARITANS (UK & ROI): 116 123 –¬†Available 24 hours a day, every day of the year. This number is FREE to call and won’t appear on your bill. You do not have to be suicidal to call.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (US):¬†1 800 273 8255 –¬†Available 24 hours a day, every day of the year. This number is FREE to call,¬†but may appear on your bill (please check with carrier).¬†You do not have to be suicidal to call.

Live outside the UK or US? For a comprehensive list of international helplines, or to find a crisis centre in your area please click here!

Recommended Links

Samaritans – Home Page

Samaritans Volunteer Sign-up Page

Books Mentioned in This Episode

Image courtesy: Alon

 

Prof. Rory O’Connor

Rory O’Connor (@suicideresearch) is¬†Chair in Health Psychology,¬†Head of Mental Health and Wellbeing at Glasgow University where he also leads the Suicidal Behaviour Research Laboratory, the leading suicide and self-harm research group in Scotland.

He is co-editor of “The International Handbook of Suicide Prevention“, Deputy Chief Editor of Archives of Suicide Research, and Associate Editor of Suicide and Life-Threatening Behavior.

As well as¬†serving on the Scientific Review Board of the American Foundation for Suicide Prevention, he also sits on the Scottish Government’s national suicide and self-harm implementation and monitoring group.

In today’s conversation we explore some common myths about suicide, why men are three times more likely than women to die by suicide and the role and responsibility of the media when it comes to reporting on this particular issue.

We discuss the development of Rory’s theory of suicidal behaviour and his mission to discover what separates the few people who die by suicide from the vast majority who don’t, the effectiveness of suicide awareness campaigns, why suicide should never be seen as a cop out and suicide attempts never dismissed as attention seeking.

We also spend a good deal of time exploring some practical advice for people, and the friends and relatives of those people, who are themselves feeling suicidal.

 

 

Integrated Motivational Volitional (IMV) Model of Suicidal Behaviour

 

CRISIS HELPLINES

SAMARITANS (UK & ROI): 116 123 –¬†Available 24 hours a day, every day of the year. This number is FREE to call and won’t appear on your bill. You do not have to be suicidal to call.

National Suicide Prevention Lifeline (US):¬†1 800 273 8255 –¬†Available 24 hours a day, every day of the year. This number is FREE to call,¬†but may appear on your bill (please check with carrier).¬†You do not have to be suicidal to call.

Live outside the UK or US? For a comprehensive list of international helplines, or to find a crisis centre in your area please click here!

Recommended Links

Suicidal Behaviour Research Lab

Media Guidelines for Reporting Suicide – Samaritans

How to Help Someone who is Suicidal and Save a Life – HelpGuide

How to make a suicide safety plan – SuicideLine

Books Mentioned in This Episode

     

Image courtesy: Colin Knowles