Posts

Prof. Linda Gask

Linda Gask (@suzypuss) is an Emerita Professor of Primary Care Psychiatry at the University of Manchester and a retired psychiatrist with over thirty years of experience working in the NHS.

She is the director and co-founder of two social enterprises including STORM, which provides training in suicide prevention, and Six Degrees, providing primary care mental health services to people in Salford, in Greater Manchester.

Linda has worked as an adviser to the World Health Organization, served on the board of the World Psychiatric Association, and in 2010 she was awarded an Honorary Fellowship of the Royal College of General Practitioners in recognition of her teaching in primary care mental health.

She is the author of more than 180 published articles, a number of books including “A Short Introduction to Psychiatry” , and the book which forms the inspiration for today’s conversation “The Other Side of Silence: A Psychiatrist’s Memoir of Depression“.

In today’s episode we explore Linda’s experience of walking the tightrope between both sides of the therapeutic process; as a trained psychiatrist helping clients through their darkest days whilst simultaneously engaged in a lifelong battle with her own recurrent bouts of severe depression.

This episode has 11 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.

Related Links

Patching the Soul – Linda’s blog about mental health and fighting stigma

Book Recommendations

                    

Image courtesy: Peter Burka

Dr. Joanna Moncrieff

Joanna Moncrieff (@joannamoncrieff) is a Reader in Critical and Social Psychiatry at University College London, and a practising psychiatrist with an interest in the history, philosophy and politics of psychiatry, and particularly in the use, misuse and misrepresentation of psychiatric drugs.

She is the author of several books including “The Myth of the Chemical Cure: A Critique of Psychiatric Drug Treatment“, “A Straight Talking Introduction to Psychiatric Drugs“, and “The Bitterest Pills: The Troubling Story of Antipsychotic Drugs“.

Joanna is also is also a founding member and co-chairperson of the Critical Psychiatry Network, a group of psychiatrists from around the world who are sceptical of the idea that mental disorders are simply brain diseases and of the dominance of the pharmaceutical industry.

In today’s episode we explore the history and development of psychiatric medication, why there is little, if any, evidence to support the idea that psychiatric medication is correcting a “chemical imbalance” or any other underlying cause of mental illness, why the disease-centred model of mental health issues is both misleading and disempowering to service users, and ultimately, why much of the “science” supporting psychiatric medication is based more on ideology than evidence.

This episode has 12 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.

Related Links

JoannaMoncrieff.com – Books, papers and blogs by Joanna Moncrieff

Mad in America – MiA’s mission is to serve as a catalyst for rethinking psychiatric care in the United States (and abroad)

Critical Psychiatry Network (CPN) – A network primarily for psychiatrists, psychiatric trainees and medical students with an interest in psychiatry

Rxisk – A free, independent drug safety website to help you weigh the benefits of any medication against its potential dangers

Mental Elf – Keeping you up to date with reliable mental health research, policy & guidance

Hearing Voices Network – For people who hear voices, see visions or have other unusual perceptions

Book Recommendations

                              

Image courtesy: IGypsyWoman

Dr. Lucy Johnstone

Lucy Johnstone (@ClinPsychLucy) is a consultant clinical psychologist, conference speaker, lecturer and trainer, and one of many professionals and service users/survivors who take a critical perspective on mental health theory and practice.

She is author of “Users and Abusers of Psychiatry“, co-editor of “Formulation in Psychology and Psychotherapy: Making Sense of People’s Problems“, and the author of the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion, “A Straight Talking Guide to Psychiatric Diagnosis“.

Lucy also writes a blog at Mad in America where she writes about the advantages of one alternative to psychiatric diagnosis, known as psychological formulation. An approach which allows for the exploration of personal meaning within relational and social contexts.

In today’s episode we discuss why the concept of psychiatric diagnosis is both invalid and unreliable, we weigh up the benefits and consequences of being labelled with a particular disorder, and whether or not the demise of the current classification system, which is acknowledged to be unsatisfactory even by the people who invented it, will lead to more constructive and helpful alternatives.

 

Related Links

Mad in America – Rethinking psychiatric care

Drop the Disorder Facebook Group – A group for anyone who is interested in challenging traditional approaches to emotional distress

A Disorder 4 Everyone – Exploring the culture of psychiatric diagnosis

Book Recommendations

                                        

Image courtesy: Wikimedia