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Tom O’Carroll

Tom O’Carroll is a self-confessed pedophile, pro-pedophile advocate, and writer.

He is a former chairman of the now disbanded Paedophile Information Exchange (PIE), an advocacy group that existed from 1974 to 1984 to lobby openly for the legal acceptance of pedophilia.

Tom has faced multiple convictions for pedophile related behavior, including two custodial sentences, the first time in 1981 for conspiracy to corrupt public morals and again in 2006 for the distribution of child pornography.

He is the author of two books, the first being “Paedophilia: The Radical Case”, an autobiographical account of Tom’s early life and involvement with the Pedophile Information Exchange and his beliefs about the nature of adult-child sexual relationships, and his second book, published under the pen name Carl Toms, is “Michael Jackson: Dangerous Liaisons” which argues that the late entertainer’s relationships with young boys were pedophilic in nature.

In today’s episode we delve in to Tom’s early life, the experience of first realizing his sexual attraction to children, his failed attempts to lead a normal life, and his pro-pedophile advocacy efforts.

We debate the nature of consent, whether or not adult-child sexual relationships are always harmful, if childhood sexual trauma is caused by the sexual acts themselves or subsequent societal judgement, and the likelihood of pro-pedophile advocacy ever resulting in a society which accepts adult-child sexual relationships.
 

Related Links

Heretic TOC – Tom’s WordPress Blog

Positive Memories – Cases of positive memories of erotic and platonic relationships and contacts of children with adults as seen from the perspective of the former minor.

Cases in the Research – Consenting Juveniles

Tom’s Recommended Studies

Angelides, S. (2004). Feminism, child sexual abuse, and the erasure of child sexuality. GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies, 10(2), 141–177.

Graaf, H. de & Rademakers, J. (2011). The psychological measurement of childhood sexual development in Western societies: methodological challenges. Journal of Sex Research, 48(2), 118-129.

Kershnar, S. (2015). Pedophilia and Adult Child Sex: A Philosophical Analysis. Lanham, MD: Lexington Books.

Kilpatrick, A.C. (1992). Long-Range Effects of Child and Adolescent Sexual Experiences: Mores, Myths, Menaces. Hillsdale NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum.

Konker C. (1992). Rethinking Child Sexual Abuse: An Anthropological Perspective. American Journal of Orthopsychiatry, 62(1), 147-53.

Leahy, T. (1996). Sex and the age of consent: The ethical issues. Social Analysis, 39 (April), 27-55.

Levine, J. (2002). Harmful to Minors: The Perils of Protecting Children from Sex. Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press.

Lilienfeld, S. O. (2002). When worlds collide: social science, politics, and the child sexual abuse meta-analysis. American Psychologist, 57(3), 176–188.

Martinson, F.M. (1994). The Sexual Life of Children. West Westport, CT: Bergin & Garvey.

O’Carroll, T. (1980). Paedophilia: The Radical Case. London: Peter Owen.

Okami, P. (1991). Self-reports of ‘positive’ childhood and adolescent sexual contacts with older persons: An exploratory study. Archives of Sexual Behavior, 20(5), 437-57.

Prescott, J.W. (1996). The origins of human love and violence. Pre- and Perinatal Psychology

Journal, 10(3), 143-188. The Origins of Peace and Violence: http://www.violence.de/prescott/pppj/article.html Accessed 18 Oct., 2017.

Primoratz, I. (1999). Ethics and sex. London: Routledge.

Rind, B. (2002). The problem with consensus morality, Archives of Sexual Behavior, 31(6), 496-8.

Rind, B., Bauserman, R., & Tromovitch, P. (1998). A meta-analytic examination of assumed properties of child sexual abuse
using college samples. Psychological Bulletin, 124(1), 22–53.

Sandfort, T. (1984) Sex in pedophilic relationships: an empirical investigation among a non-representative group of boys. Journal of Sex Research, 20(2), 123-42.

Wilson, G.D. & Cox, D.N. (1983). The Child-Lovers: A Study of Paedophiles in Society. London: Peter Owen.

 

Book Recommendations

     

Support Lines for Adult Survivors

The National Association for People Abused in Childhood (NAPAC) – UK
Call 0808 801 0331 free from all landlines and mobiles
Monday – Thursday 10:00-21:00 and Friday 10:00-18:00
NAPAC provides a national freephone support line for adults who have suffered any type of abuse in childhood.
Website: www.napac.org.uk

RAINN (Rape, Abuse & Incest National Network)
The nation’s largest anti-sexual violence organization. operates the National Sexual Assault Hotline, as well as the Department of Defense (DoD) Safe Helpline and carries out programs to prevent sexual assault, help survivors, and to ensure that perpetrators are brought to justice through victim services, public education, public policy, and consulting services.
Find help and the resources you need. Call 800.656.4673
https://www.rainn.org/

Support Lines for Children

Childhelp National Child Abuse Hotline – U.S. and Canada
Dedicated to the prevention of child abuse. The hotline is staffed 24 hours a day, 7 days a week with professional crisis counselors who—through interpreters—provide assistance in over 170 languages. The hotline offers crisis intervention, information, and referrals to thousands of emergency, social service, and support resources. All calls are confidential. (1-800) 4-A-CHILD or (1-800) 422-4453
https://www.childhelp.org/hotline/

NSPCC – UK
The UK’s leading children’s charity, preventing abuse and helping those affected to recover.
Help for adults concerned about a child: 0808 800 5000
Help for children and young people: 0800 1111
https://www.nspcc.org.uk/

Image courtesy: Ubi Desperare Nescio

Gary Wilson

Gary Wilson (@YourBrainOnPorn) is a retired anatomy and physiology teacher, public speaker and writer.

Gary is the author of “Your Brain on Porn: Internet Pornography and the Emerging Science of Addiction“, and the co-founder, alongside his wife Marnia, of YourBrainOnPorn.com, a secular, science-based web site providing support and information for people wanting to recover from mental, physical, and social problems related to the consumption of porn.

In today’s episode we explore the neuroscience of porn addiction, the role of dopamine in driving porn use, why emotions such as shock and disgust make pornography not less, but more appealing, and the links between porn usage and erectile dysfunction.

We also discuss links between porn addiction and mental health issues such as depression and social anxiety, how chronic masturbation could be responsible for feelings of fatigue and brain fog, why increasing number of men are claiming to have no interest in sex with real women, how you can tell if you’re addicted to porn, and if so, what you can do to get yourself out of it.

 

Related Links

Your Brain on Porn – Gary’s website

Reboot Nation – Support forum helping people recover from artificial sexual stimulation

NoFap – Reddit Forum

PornFree – Reddit Forum

Book Recommendations

     

Image courtesy: Surian Soosay

 

Wendy Maltz

Wendy Maltz (@healthysextweet) is an internationally recognized certified sex therapist with more than forty years of clinical experience, and a leading expert on healing sexual abuse, women’s sexual fantasies, healthy sexuality, and recovery from porn-related concerns.

She has served as an Adjunct Instructor teaching “Human Sexuality in Counseling” at the University of Oregon, and in 2014, she received the prestigious Carnes award from the Society for the Advancement of Sexual Health for “her outstanding work in the field of sexual addiction.”

Wendy is the author of numerous books including “Private Thoughts: Exploring the Power of Women’s Sexual Fantasies“, “The Sexual Healing Journey: A Guide for Survivors of Sexual Abuse“, and the book which expands on today’s topic “The Porn Trap: The Essential Guide to Overcoming Problems Caused by Pornography“.

In today’s episode we discuss the social and psychological consequences for young men who grow up with fast and easy access to increasingly extreme pornography.

 

Related Links

HealthySex.com – Wendy’s website

Do You Know the Difference? (Porn-related Sex vs Healthy Sex) – Poster

The Hazards of Porn – Poster

Teenagers are having less sex, but contracting more STI’s – Cosmopolitan

Book Recommendations

          

 

Image courtesy: Heather Hopkins