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Dr. Brian King

Dr. Brian King (@drbrianking) is a psychologist, stand-up comedian and public speaker who travels the world as a performer and an instructor, giving seminars to thousand of people each year on the health benefits of humor.

He was the founder and producer of the highly reviewed Wharf Room Comedy show in San Francisco and produces the annual Bay Area comedy competition “Walk the Plank”.

Brian is the author of a number of books including “Frozen Coffee Melting“, “A Field Guide to the North American Bloody Mary“, and the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion, “The Laughing Cure: Emotional and Physical Healing – A Comedian Reveals Why Laughter Really is the Best Medicine“.

In today’s episode we explore the evolutionary origins of humor, whether being funny is a natural ability or a skill that anyone can learn, the anatomy of joke-telling, the mental and physical benefits of laughter, and why humor can be the perfect antidote to some of life’s darkest moments.

 

This episode has 22 minutes of bonus content! Subscribe for as little as $2 /month to gain access to this and other exclusive content.





Related Links

Brian’s Website

Brian’s Facebook Page

Brian’s YouTube Channel

Science declares this is the funniest joke in the world – CNet

Book Recommendations

               

Image courtesy: Petful via Flickr

Gregory B. Sadler PhD

Greg Sadler (@philosopher70) is a philosopher, academic entrepreneur and writer.

He is the president and co-founder of ReasonIO, a project aimed at taking difficult philosophical texts and thinkers and making them accessible to non-philosophers, as well as providing philosophical workshops, consulting and counselling services to organizations, students and members of the public.

His YouTube channel boasts almost 50,000 subscribers and more than 4.7 millions video views to-date, with more than 1300 videos on everything from existentialism to utilitarianism, and lectures on the teachings of philosophers as diverse as the ancient Greeks like Plato and Aristotle right the way up to modern thinkers such as Martin Heidegger and Albert Camus.

Greg is the editor of Stoicism Today, the official blog for the Modern Stoicism Organization, and the producer of the “Half Hour Hegel” video series.

In today’s episode we explore the various causes and manifestations of anger, the difference between chronic and acute anger, and the relationship between anger and vengeance.

We discuss why some people’s anger becomes directed inwards, towards the self, while other people’s anger is directed towards other people and the outside world, why anger can sometimes be a productive or even an enjoyable experience, and we close up by turning to stoic philosophy for some tips and advice on how to avoid hitting the roof when you’re absolutely fucking steaming.

 

Related Links

ReasonIO – Greg’s website

Greg’s YouTube Channel

Stoicism Today – The official blog for the Modern Stoicism Organization

Greg’s Patreon – Support his YouTube work and gain access to exclusive content

Book Recommendations

               

Image courtesy: Fred

Susan Pearse

Susan Pearse is a writer, speaker and leadership consultant specializing in mindfulness and attention.

Along with her business partner Martina Sheehan, she is co-founder of Mind Gardener offering mindfulness based retreats and workshops for individuals and organizations.

She is co-author of a number of books including “One Moment Please: It’s Time to Pay Attention”, “Wired For Life: Retrain Your Brain and Thrive”, and the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion, “Do Less Be More: How To Slow Down And Make Space For What Really Matters”.

In today’s episode we discuss why doing nothing matters, some of the reason people find it difficult to let go and relax, we answers questions such as when does productivity spillover into busyness, how to know the difference between relaxing and wasting time, and how relaxation can actually help, rather than hinder, your ambitions.

We also offer a few tips from Susan’s book “Do Less Be More” on how to master the art of doing nothing including how to go on a date with yourself, having a not-to-do list, and the beauty of boredom.
 

Related Links

SusanPearse.com – Best selling author, leadership expert and co-Founder of Mind Gardener.

MindGardener.com – A space dedicated to supporting your journey with tools, inspiration and guidance.

Mind Gardener – Facebook Page

Book Recommendations

                    

Image courtesy: Jon Collier

 

Glenn Schiraldi, PhD

Dr. Glenn Schiraldi is a graduate of West Point, a Vietnam-era veteran, and founder of Resilience Training International.

Glenn has served on the stress management faculties at The Pentagon, The International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, and The University of Maryland, where he received the Outstanding Teacher Award.

Glenn is also author of a number of books including “The Self-Esteem Workbook“, “The Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder Sourcebook“, and the book which forms the basis of today’s discussion “The Resilience Workbook: Essential Skills to Recover from Stress, Trauma, and Adversity“.

In today’s episode we discuss what precisely resilience is and what it means to be resilient, how resilience can act as a barrier that protects us from things like stress, depression and anxiety, and some tips on how you can cultivate and building resilience in yourself.

 

The discipline which makes the soldiers of a free country reliable in battle is not to be gained by harsh or tyrannical treatment. On the contrary, such treatment is far more likely to destroy than to make an army. It is possible to impart instruction and give commands in such a manner and such a tone of voice as to inspire in the soldier no feeling, but an intense desire to obey, while the opposite manner and tone of voice cannot fail to excite strong resentment and a desire to disobey. The one mode or other of dealing with subordinates springs from a corresponding spirit in the breast of the commander. He who feels the respect which is due to others cannot fail to inspire in them respect for himself. While he who feels, and hence manifests, disrespect towards others, especially his subordinates, cannot fail to inspire hatred against himself.

— John M. Schofield

 

Related Links

Resilience Training International – Glenn’s website

How Resilient Are You? – Take Glenn’s Resilience Checkup

Book Recommendations

                         

Image courtesy: Gabriela Fab

 

Prof. Carmine Pariante

Carmine Pariante (@ParianteSPILab) is Professor of Biological Psychiatry at Kings College London, where he also leads the Stress, Psychiatry and Immunology (SPI) Lab, investigating the relationship between stress, mental health and the immune system.

Carmine is the editor of a number of books including “Understanding Depression: A Translational Approach“, and “Behavioral Neurobiology of Stress-related Disorders“, and he also writes a blog for the Huffington Post.

He has received a number of awards for his research including the 2012 “Academic Psychiatrist of the Year” Award from the Royal College of Psychiatrists, the 2015 Anna-Monika Prize for Research on Depression, and the Norman Cousins Award for outstanding contributions to research in psychoneuroimmunology.

In today’s episode we discuss the biology of stress, everything from the anatomy of the brain, to the endocrine system, and how it’s all functions together. We explore the evolutionary advantages of the stress response, how the pressures of modern life can cause stress to become chronic, and how the physiological damage of long-term stress can lead to conditions such as anxiety and depression.

 

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Related Links

Stress, Psychiatry and Immunology (SPI) Lab – Facebook Page

Book Recommendations

          

Image courtesy: Amy McTigue